Kimberly Rieniets DO And Danielle L Williams NP

West Denver Endocrinology

720-447-8837

Belmar Plaza, , 215 S Wadsworth Blvd, 530
 Lakewood, CO 80226

See Online Booking Page

Patient Education

Kimberly Rieniets DO and Danielle L Williams NP would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with me. I will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

To schedule an appointment, go to https://bookendocrinologist.10to8.com/

I welcome you to my practice and look forward to caring for you.

For more information:

https://acrobat.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:7b38cede-cd91-30ef-82c9-cff2fa8ee280 
 

clicking on below links will take you to a trusted 3rd party website 

https://www.thyroid.org/thyroid-information/

http://www.empoweryourhealth.org  

https://www.hormone.org/

https://www.endocrineweb.com/

www.endocrinediseases.org/

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-supplement-con/

https://www.skeptic.com/reading_room/why-functional-medicine-is-bogus/

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/bogus-diagnostic-tests/

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-hormone-myth/ 

https://endocrinenews.endocrine.org/myth-adrenal-fatigue/ 

https://www.naturopathicdiaries.com/

http://outpatient.aace.com/

http://obesity.aace.com/

https://www.thyroid.org/american-thyroid-association-statement-on-wilsons-syndrome/

https://www.eatthis.com/thyroid-myths/

Addison's Disease

Addison's disease is a rare endocrine disorder in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough steroid hormones for proper bodily function. In people with Addison's disease, the adrenal glands do not produce enough cortisol, and in some cases, the adrenal glands also fail to produce enough aldosterone. These hormones are essential to body function. Cortisol affects the body response to stress, the body's ability to convert food into energy and the immune system's inflammatory response. Aldosterone helps to maintain the balance of sodium, potassium and water within the body. Both hormones also help to regulate blood pressure. When these hormones are at insufficient levels within the body, distressing and dangerous symptoms may occur. ...


Read More...

Adrenal Tumors

The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys at the back of the upper abdominal cavity. These small, triangular organs produce several hormones, including aldosterone, cortisol, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, cortisone, adrenalin and norepinephrine. Tumors can cause the adrenal glands to produce too much of one or more of these substances, resulting in serious health issues. Tumors of the adrenal gland may be caused by diseases of the endocrine system, such as Conn's syndrome, or may result in the development of endocrine diseases, such as Cushing's syndrome. Most adrenal tumors, even those that cause symptoms, are benign. ...


Read More...

Bone Mineral Density Test

A bone mineral density (BMD) test evaluates an individual's bone strength by measuring the density of calcium and other minerals in particular areas of bone. During normal aging, bones lose minerals and become thinner. If they become abnormally thin, however, the patient has a condition known as osteoporosis. ...


Read More...

Cushing's Syndrome

Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder caused by long-term exposure to abnormally high levels of cortisol. Sometimes, corticosteroids used to treat inflammatory disease can lead to Cushing's syndrome. At other times, the disorder is caused by a tumor on one of the endocrine glands or on the lungs. Cushing's syndrome should not be confused with Cushing's disease, which is a form of Cushing's syndrome in which the pituitary gland secretes too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) which in turn promotes the release of too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome most frequently occurs in adults between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients who are obese, diabetic, or suffer from hypertension are at greater risk of developing the disorder. ...


Read More...

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables sugar or glucose to enter cells. Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. ...


Read More...

Endocrinology

Endocrinology is the branch of medicine that focuses on the endocrine system, the system comprised of glands that produce essential hormones. These hormones regulate a great many bodily processes, including metabolism, reproduction, sexual function, growth and development. The glands of the endocrine system are the thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, ovaries, testes, adrenal, pituitary, and hypothalamus. Endocrinologists diagnose and treat glandular diseases and hormone imbalances. ...


Read More...

Graves' Disease

Graves' disease is a disorder of the immune system resulting in the overproduction of hormones by the thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. Like most other immune system irregularities, its cause is unknown, though research to date has shown that heredity, age, gender and stress level are risk factors for the condition. Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism and is most common in women between 20 and 40 years of age. Graves' disease is usually treatable and may even resolve on its own over time. Left untreated, however, a severe case can become life-threatening. ...


Read More...

Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland, which plays an important role in managing many of the functions of the body. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result of Hashimoto's disease, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women are more likely than men to develop this condition. Left untreated, Hashimoto's disease may cause a variety of health complications. ...


Read More...

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, also known as an overactive thyroid gland, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland excretes an excessive amount of thyroid hormones. This overproduction creates more hormones than the body needs and causes many important bodily functions to speed up. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use, metabolism, heart and nervous system functions and other metabolic functions. An overproduction of thyroid hormones can lead to weight loss, irregular heartbeat and irritability. Hyperthyroidism is more common in people over the age of 60 and women are more likely than men to develop hyperthyroidism. ...


Read More...

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a common condition that occurs when an underactive thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones to properly manage many important functions of the body. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use and metabolic functions. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women over the age of age of 60 are at the highest risk for developing hypothyroidism. Left untreated, this condition may cause a variety of health complications including obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease ...


Read More...

Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy

Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland malfunctions and produces an abnormal quantity of hormones. When a malfunctioning thyroid gland produces too much or too little hormone during pregnancy, abnormal hormone secretion can be damaging not only to the mother, but to the developing fetus as well. This is because thyroid hormone is essential to the development of the fetal brain and nervous system and, until about 12 weeks into gestation, the fetus depends on its mother's supply of thyroid hormone. ...


Read More...

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a rare endocrinological disorder in which an excessive amount of growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland after normal growth has been completed. In almost all cases, acromegaly results from a noncancerous tumor on the pituitary gland. In rare instances, acromegaly is caused by a tumor elsewhere in the body. ...


Read More...

Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia means that a patient has an overabundance of calcium in the blood. While calcium is essential and plays a significant role in maintaining bone strength, muscular contraction and central nervous system function, too much calcium can be harmful. Hypercalcemia most frequently affects women over 50 years of age. Most often, hypercalcemia is due to overactivity of the parathyroid gland, known as hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps regulate calcium blood levels. If these glands secrete too much PTH, the result is hypercalcemia. Other possible causes of this condition include hyperthyroidism, certain types of cancer, inflammatory granulomas, adrenal gland disorders, very high dietary calcium intake, kidney failure, an overabundance of vitamin D and certain medications. ...


Read More...

Hypoparathyroidism

Hypoparathyroidism is a disease condition in which the parathyroid glands, located at the base of the neck on the thyroid glands, produce too little parathyroid hormone, known as PTH. This hormone aids in regulating the levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D in the bloodstream. In patients with hypoparathyroidism, phosphorus levels increase and calcium levels decrease. ...


Read More...

Hypopituitarism

Hypopituitarism is a rare disorder in which the pituitary gland does not produce an adequate supply of one or more pituitary hormone. Because the pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain, produces hormones that control the functions of many other organs and glands, inadequate hormone production can lead to serious loss of function in one or another system of the body. ...


Read More...

Metabolic Bone Diseases

Metabolic bone disease refers to a variety of disorders that affect bone strength or structure. Osteoporosis is the most widespread of these conditions, but there are a number of other metabolic bone diseases that can lead to fractures, deformity and abnormal functioning if not treated promptly. These disorders may be the result of genetic factors, diet and lifestyle, or other underlying disease conditions. ...


Read More...

Hyperparathyroidism

The parathyroid glands are four small glands in the neck that are part of the endocrine system. They produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which maintains calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood.

The most common disease associated with the parathyroid glands is overproduction of PTH, known as hyperparathyroidism. Twice as many women as men suffer from this condition and the risk of developing hyperparathyroidism increases with age, as it is more common in patients over the age of 60. Risk factors for hyperparathyroidism include having had radiation treatment to the head or neck. Rarely, cancer may be the cause of the condition. ...


Read More...

Hypocalcemia

Hypocalcemia is a disorder in which there is a calcium deficiency in the blood. Calcium is an essential mineral that assists in bone strengthening, muscle contraction and proper functioning of the central nervous system. While patients with hypocalcemia may be asymptomatic, the condition can be life-threatening if left untreated. It most commonly occurs in populations where there is insufficient intake of vitamin D or in patients who have undergone a total parathyroidectomy (removal of the parathyroid glands). It may also occur as a congenital condition in infants, particularly those born prematurely or to a diabetic mother, or in infants stressed by illness or infection. ...


Read More...

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and brittle, placing them at a high risk for fracture. In all individuals, bone wears down over time, but is replaced with new bone tissue. As people age, bone loss occurs at a faster rate than new bone is created, resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the result of increasing bone loss, and is more common in older people, especially women. ...


Read More...

Parathyroidectomy

The parathyroid glands are four small glands located behind the thyroid that regulate the calcium level in the blood. By controlling the amount of calcium in the body, the parathyroid glands control the strength and density of the bones, as well as other systemic functions. A parathyroidectomy is a procedure during which one or more of the parathyroid glands is removed. The most common reason for a parathyroidectomy is the presence of a small benign tumor, known as an adenoma. The adenoma causes an overproduction of parathyroid hormone (PTH), resulting in hyperparathyroidism, an imbalance that can cause uncomfortable and serious symptoms. ...


Read More...

Pituitary Adenoma

A pituitary adenoma is a tumor that develops on the pituitary gland, a gland located at the base of the brain. Since the pituitary gland not only secretes several hormones, but also regulates secretions from other glands, an adenoma may affect many systems of the body. Pituitary adenomas are benign, though in rare instances they may become malignant. Treatment is usually required to ensure proper pituitary gland function and to alleviate or prevent symptoms. ...


Read More...



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Addison's Disease

Addison's disease is a rare endocrine disorder in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough steroid hormones for proper bodily function. In people with Addison's disease, the adrenal glands do not produce enough cortisol, and in some cases, the adrenal glands also fail to produce enough aldosterone. These hormones are essential to body function. Cortisol affects the body response to stress, the body's ability to convert food into energy and the immune system's inflammatory response. Aldosterone helps to maintain the balance of sodium, potassium and water within the body. Both hormones also help to regulate blood pressure. When these hormones are at insufficient levels within the body, distressing and dangerous symptoms may occur. ...


Read More...

Adrenal Tumors

The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys at the back of the upper abdominal cavity. These small, triangular organs produce several hormones, including aldosterone, cortisol, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, cortisone, adrenalin and norepinephrine. Tumors can cause the adrenal glands to produce too much of one or more of these substances, resulting in serious health issues. Tumors of the adrenal gland may be caused by diseases of the endocrine system, such as Conn's syndrome, or may result in the development of endocrine diseases, such as Cushing's syndrome. Most adrenal tumors, even those that cause symptoms, are benign. ...


Read More...

Bone Mineral Density Test

A bone mineral density (BMD) test evaluates an individual's bone strength by measuring the density of calcium and other minerals in particular areas of bone. During normal aging, bones lose minerals and become thinner. If they become abnormally thin, however, the patient has a condition known as osteoporosis. ...


Read More...

Cushing's Syndrome

Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder caused by long-term exposure to abnormally high levels of cortisol. Sometimes, corticosteroids used to treat inflammatory disease can lead to Cushing's syndrome. At other times, the disorder is caused by a tumor on one of the endocrine glands or on the lungs. Cushing's syndrome should not be confused with Cushing's disease, which is a form of Cushing's syndrome in which the pituitary gland secretes too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) which in turn promotes the release of too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome most frequently occurs in adults between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients who are obese, diabetic, or suffer from hypertension are at greater risk of developing the disorder. ...


Read More...

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables sugar or glucose to enter cells. Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. ...


Read More...

Endocrinology

Endocrinology is the branch of medicine that focuses on the endocrine system, the system comprised of glands that produce essential hormones. These hormones regulate a great many bodily processes, including metabolism, reproduction, sexual function, growth and development. The glands of the endocrine system are the thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, ovaries, testes, adrenal, pituitary, and hypothalamus. Endocrinologists diagnose and treat glandular diseases and hormone imbalances. ...


Read More...

Graves' Disease

Graves' disease is a disorder of the immune system resulting in the overproduction of hormones by the thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. Like most other immune system irregularities, its cause is unknown, though research to date has shown that heredity, age, gender and stress level are risk factors for the condition. Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism and is most common in women between 20 and 40 years of age. Graves' disease is usually treatable and may even resolve on its own over time. Left untreated, however, a severe case can become life-threatening. ...


Read More...

Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland, which plays an important role in managing many of the functions of the body. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result of Hashimoto's disease, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women are more likely than men to develop this condition. Left untreated, Hashimoto's disease may cause a variety of health complications. ...


Read More...

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, also known as an overactive thyroid gland, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland excretes an excessive amount of thyroid hormones. This overproduction creates more hormones than the body needs and causes many important bodily functions to speed up. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use, metabolism, heart and nervous system functions and other metabolic functions. An overproduction of thyroid hormones can lead to weight loss, irregular heartbeat and irritability. Hyperthyroidism is more common in people over the age of 60 and women are more likely than men to develop hyperthyroidism. ...


Read More...

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a common condition that occurs when an underactive thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones to properly manage many important functions of the body. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use and metabolic functions. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women over the age of age of 60 are at the highest risk for developing hypothyroidism. Left untreated, this condition may cause a variety of health complications including obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease ...


Read More...

Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy

Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland malfunctions and produces an abnormal quantity of hormones. When a malfunctioning thyroid gland produces too much or too little hormone during pregnancy, abnormal hormone secretion can be damaging not only to the mother, but to the developing fetus as well. This is because thyroid hormone is essential to the development of the fetal brain and nervous system and, until about 12 weeks into gestation, the fetus depends on its mother's supply of thyroid hormone. ...


Read More...

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a rare endocrinological disorder in which an excessive amount of growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland after normal growth has been completed. In almost all cases, acromegaly results from a noncancerous tumor on the pituitary gland. In rare instances, acromegaly is caused by a tumor elsewhere in the body. ...


Read More...

Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia means that a patient has an overabundance of calcium in the blood. While calcium is essential and plays a significant role in maintaining bone strength, muscular contraction and central nervous system function, too much calcium can be harmful. Hypercalcemia most frequently affects women over 50 years of age. Most often, hypercalcemia is due to overactivity of the parathyroid gland, known as hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps regulate calcium blood levels. If these glands secrete too much PTH, the result is hypercalcemia. Other possible causes of this condition include hyperthyroidism, certain types of cancer, inflammatory granulomas, adrenal gland disorders, very high dietary calcium intake, kidney failure, an overabundance of vitamin D and certain medications. ...


Read More...

Hypoparathyroidism

Hypoparathyroidism is a disease condition in which the parathyroid glands, located at the base of the neck on the thyroid glands, produce too little parathyroid hormone, known as PTH. This hormone aids in regulating the levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D in the bloodstream. In patients with hypoparathyroidism, phosphorus levels increase and calcium levels decrease. ...


Read More...

Hypopituitarism

Hypopituitarism is a rare disorder in which the pituitary gland does not produce an adequate supply of one or more pituitary hormone. Because the pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain, produces hormones that control the functions of many other organs and glands, inadequate hormone production can lead to serious loss of function in one or another system of the body. ...


Read More...

Female Infertility

Couples are considered to have infertility problems if they have been unable to conceive after a prolonged period, usually a year, of regular, unprotected sexual intercourse. Infertility may be attributed to the man, the woman, or both partners. When a female cause of infertility is determined, which occurs about one-third of the time, there are many measures that can be taken to help the couple conceive. Single women who are having trouble becoming pregnant may also seek medical evaluation. ...


Read More...

Metabolic Bone Diseases

Metabolic bone disease refers to a variety of disorders that affect bone strength or structure. Osteoporosis is the most widespread of these conditions, but there are a number of other metabolic bone diseases that can lead to fractures, deformity and abnormal functioning if not treated promptly. These disorders may be the result of genetic factors, diet and lifestyle, or other underlying disease conditions. ...


Read More...

Hyperparathyroidism

The parathyroid glands are four small glands in the neck that are part of the endocrine system. They produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which maintains calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood.

The most common disease associated with the parathyroid glands is overproduction of PTH, known as hyperparathyroidism. Twice as many women as men suffer from this condition and the risk of developing hyperparathyroidism increases with age, as it is more common in patients over the age of 60. Risk factors for hyperparathyroidism include having had radiation treatment to the head or neck. Rarely, cancer may be the cause of the condition. ...


Read More...

Hypocalcemia

Hypocalcemia is a disorder in which there is a calcium deficiency in the blood. Calcium is an essential mineral that assists in bone strengthening, muscle contraction and proper functioning of the central nervous system. While patients with hypocalcemia may be asymptomatic, the condition can be life-threatening if left untreated. It most commonly occurs in populations where there is insufficient intake of vitamin D or in patients who have undergone a total parathyroidectomy (removal of the parathyroid glands). It may also occur as a congenital condition in infants, particularly those born prematurely or to a diabetic mother, or in infants stressed by illness or infection. ...


Read More...

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and brittle, placing them at a high risk for fracture. In all individuals, bone wears down over time, but is replaced with new bone tissue. As people age, bone loss occurs at a faster rate than new bone is created, resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the result of increasing bone loss, and is more common in older people, especially women. ...


Read More...

Parathyroidectomy

The parathyroid glands are four small glands located behind the thyroid that regulate the calcium level in the blood. By controlling the amount of calcium in the body, the parathyroid glands control the strength and density of the bones, as well as other systemic functions. A parathyroidectomy is a procedure during which one or more of the parathyroid glands is removed. The most common reason for a parathyroidectomy is the presence of a small benign tumor, known as an adenoma. The adenoma causes an overproduction of parathyroid hormone (PTH), resulting in hyperparathyroidism, an imbalance that can cause uncomfortable and serious symptoms. ...


Read More...

Pituitary Adenoma

A pituitary adenoma is a tumor that develops on the pituitary gland, a gland located at the base of the brain. Since the pituitary gland not only secretes several hormones, but also regulates secretions from other glands, an adenoma may affect many systems of the body. Pituitary adenomas are benign, though in rare instances they may become malignant. Treatment is usually required to ensure proper pituitary gland function and to alleviate or prevent symptoms. ...


Read More...

Addison's Disease

Addison's disease is a rare endocrine disorder in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough steroid hormones for proper bodily function. In people with Addison's disease, the adrenal glands do not produce enough cortisol, and in some cases, the adrenal glands also fail to produce enough aldosterone. These hormones are essential to body function. Cortisol affects the body response to stress, the body's ability to convert food into energy and the immune system's inflammatory response. Aldosterone helps to maintain the balance of sodium, potassium and water within the body. Both hormones also help to regulate blood pressure. When these hormones are at insufficient levels within the body, distressing and dangerous symptoms may occur. ...


Read More...

Adrenal Tumors

The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys at the back of the upper abdominal cavity. These small, triangular organs produce several hormones, including aldosterone, cortisol, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, cortisone, adrenalin and norepinephrine. Tumors can cause the adrenal glands to produce too much of one or more of these substances, resulting in serious health issues. Tumors of the adrenal gland may be caused by diseases of the endocrine system, such as Conn's syndrome, or may result in the development of endocrine diseases, such as Cushing's syndrome. Most adrenal tumors, even those that cause symptoms, are benign. ...


Read More...

Bone Mineral Density Test

A bone mineral density (BMD) test evaluates an individual's bone strength by measuring the density of calcium and other minerals in particular areas of bone. During normal aging, bones lose minerals and become thinner. If they become abnormally thin, however, the patient has a condition known as osteoporosis. ...


Read More...

Cushing's Syndrome

Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder caused by long-term exposure to abnormally high levels of cortisol. Sometimes, corticosteroids used to treat inflammatory disease can lead to Cushing's syndrome. At other times, the disorder is caused by a tumor on one of the endocrine glands or on the lungs. Cushing's syndrome should not be confused with Cushing's disease, which is a form of Cushing's syndrome in which the pituitary gland secretes too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) which in turn promotes the release of too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome most frequently occurs in adults between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients who are obese, diabetic, or suffer from hypertension are at greater risk of developing the disorder. ...


Read More...

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables sugar or glucose to enter cells. Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. ...


Read More...

Endocrinology

Endocrinology is the branch of medicine that focuses on the endocrine system, the system comprised of glands that produce essential hormones. These hormones regulate a great many bodily processes, including metabolism, reproduction, sexual function, growth and development. The glands of the endocrine system are the thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, ovaries, testes, adrenal, pituitary, and hypothalamus. Endocrinologists diagnose and treat glandular diseases and hormone imbalances. ...


Read More...

Graves' Disease

Graves' disease is a disorder of the immune system resulting in the overproduction of hormones by the thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. Like most other immune system irregularities, its cause is unknown, though research to date has shown that heredity, age, gender and stress level are risk factors for the condition. Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism and is most common in women between 20 and 40 years of age. Graves' disease is usually treatable and may even resolve on its own over time. Left untreated, however, a severe case can become life-threatening. ...


Read More...

Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland, which plays an important role in managing many of the functions of the body. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result of Hashimoto's disease, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women are more likely than men to develop this condition. Left untreated, Hashimoto's disease may cause a variety of health complications. ...


Read More...

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, also known as an overactive thyroid gland, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland excretes an excessive amount of thyroid hormones. This overproduction creates more hormones than the body needs and causes many important bodily functions to speed up. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use, metabolism, heart and nervous system functions and other metabolic functions. An overproduction of thyroid hormones can lead to weight loss, irregular heartbeat and irritability. Hyperthyroidism is more common in people over the age of 60 and women are more likely than men to develop hyperthyroidism. ...


Read More...

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a common condition that occurs when an underactive thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones to properly manage many important functions of the body. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use and metabolic functions. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women over the age of age of 60 are at the highest risk for developing hypothyroidism. Left untreated, this condition may cause a variety of health complications including obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease ...


Read More...

Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy

Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland malfunctions and produces an abnormal quantity of hormones. When a malfunctioning thyroid gland produces too much or too little hormone during pregnancy, abnormal hormone secretion can be damaging not only to the mother, but to the developing fetus as well. This is because thyroid hormone is essential to the development of the fetal brain and nervous system and, until about 12 weeks into gestation, the fetus depends on its mother's supply of thyroid hormone. ...


Read More...

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a rare endocrinological disorder in which an excessive amount of growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland after normal growth has been completed. In almost all cases, acromegaly results from a noncancerous tumor on the pituitary gland. In rare instances, acromegaly is caused by a tumor elsewhere in the body. ...


Read More...

Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia means that a patient has an overabundance of calcium in the blood. While calcium is essential and plays a significant role in maintaining bone strength, muscular contraction and central nervous system function, too much calcium can be harmful. Hypercalcemia most frequently affects women over 50 years of age. Most often, hypercalcemia is due to overactivity of the parathyroid gland, known as hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps regulate calcium blood levels. If these glands secrete too much PTH, the result is hypercalcemia. Other possible causes of this condition include hyperthyroidism, certain types of cancer, inflammatory granulomas, adrenal gland disorders, very high dietary calcium intake, kidney failure, an overabundance of vitamin D and certain medications. ...


Read More...

Hypoparathyroidism

Hypoparathyroidism is a disease condition in which the parathyroid glands, located at the base of the neck on the thyroid glands, produce too little parathyroid hormone, known as PTH. This hormone aids in regulating the levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D in the bloodstream. In patients with hypoparathyroidism, phosphorus levels increase and calcium levels decrease. ...


Read More...

Hypopituitarism

Hypopituitarism is a rare disorder in which the pituitary gland does not produce an adequate supply of one or more pituitary hormone. Because the pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain, produces hormones that control the functions of many other organs and glands, inadequate hormone production can lead to serious loss of function in one or another system of the body. ...


Read More...

Female Infertility

Couples are considered to have infertility problems if they have been unable to conceive after a prolonged period, usually a year, of regular, unprotected sexual intercourse. Infertility may be attributed to the man, the woman, or both partners. When a female cause of infertility is determined, which occurs about one-third of the time, there are many measures that can be taken to help the couple conceive. Single women who are having trouble becoming pregnant may also seek medical evaluation. ...


Read More...

Metabolic Bone Diseases

Metabolic bone disease refers to a variety of disorders that affect bone strength or structure. Osteoporosis is the most widespread of these conditions, but there are a number of other metabolic bone diseases that can lead to fractures, deformity and abnormal functioning if not treated promptly. These disorders may be the result of genetic factors, diet and lifestyle, or other underlying disease conditions. ...


Read More...

Hyperparathyroidism

The parathyroid glands are four small glands in the neck that are part of the endocrine system. They produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which maintains calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood.

The most common disease associated with the parathyroid glands is overproduction of PTH, known as hyperparathyroidism. Twice as many women as men suffer from this condition and the risk of developing hyperparathyroidism increases with age, as it is more common in patients over the age of 60. Risk factors for hyperparathyroidism include having had radiation treatment to the head or neck. Rarely, cancer may be the cause of the condition. ...


Read More...

Hypocalcemia

Hypocalcemia is a disorder in which there is a calcium deficiency in the blood. Calcium is an essential mineral that assists in bone strengthening, muscle contraction and proper functioning of the central nervous system. While patients with hypocalcemia may be asymptomatic, the condition can be life-threatening if left untreated. It most commonly occurs in populations where there is insufficient intake of vitamin D or in patients who have undergone a total parathyroidectomy (removal of the parathyroid glands). It may also occur as a congenital condition in infants, particularly those born prematurely or to a diabetic mother, or in infants stressed by illness or infection. ...


Read More...

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and brittle, placing them at a high risk for fracture. In all individuals, bone wears down over time, but is replaced with new bone tissue. As people age, bone loss occurs at a faster rate than new bone is created, resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the result of increasing bone loss, and is more common in older people, especially women. ...


Read More...

Parathyroidectomy

The parathyroid glands are four small glands located behind the thyroid that regulate the calcium level in the blood. By controlling the amount of calcium in the body, the parathyroid glands control the strength and density of the bones, as well as other systemic functions. A parathyroidectomy is a procedure during which one or more of the parathyroid glands is removed. The most common reason for a parathyroidectomy is the presence of a small benign tumor, known as an adenoma. The adenoma causes an overproduction of parathyroid hormone (PTH), resulting in hyperparathyroidism, an imbalance that can cause uncomfortable and serious symptoms. ...


Read More...

Pituitary Adenoma

A pituitary adenoma is a tumor that develops on the pituitary gland, a gland located at the base of the brain. Since the pituitary gland not only secretes several hormones, but also regulates secretions from other glands, an adenoma may affect many systems of the body. Pituitary adenomas are benign, though in rare instances they may become malignant. Treatment is usually required to ensure proper pituitary gland function and to alleviate or prevent symptoms. ...


Read More...

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine system disorder that commonly affects women in their reproductive years. Women with PCOS often have multiple small cysts on their ovaries and experience irregular menstrual periods. PCOS is the leading cause of infertility in women and although the exact cause is unknown, it is believed to be the result of a hormonal imbalance. In women with PCOS, the ovaries produce more androgens than normal. High levels of these hormones affect the development and release of eggs during ovulation, and may also cause troubling symptoms such as excess hair growth and acne. ...


Read More...

Precocious Puberty

Puberty is the period when a young person begins the process of sexual maturation that will result in the ability to reproduce. Puberty involves accelerated growth and the development of secondary sexual characteristics. These bodily changes occur at various ages, usually between 9 and 14 years of age for girls and 12 and 16 years of age for boys, and are associated with psychological changes as well. Precocious puberty occurs when the process of sexual maturation begins at an abnormally young age. ...


Read More...

Hormone Imbalance

Hormones are natural chemicals within the cells of the body that travel through the bloodstream to organs and tissues. Hormones are essential for a variety of functions, including regulating a woman's metabolism, growth, immunity function and sexual reproduction. Hormone production tends to decrease naturally over time. As the production of certain hormones decreases, there may be an overproduction of other hormones within the body, which often results in hormonal imbalances that affect the health in different ways. ...


Read More...

Addison's Disease

Addison's disease is a rare endocrine disorder in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough steroid hormones for proper bodily function. In people with Addison's disease, the adrenal glands do not produce enough cortisol, and in some cases, the adrenal glands also fail to produce enough aldosterone. These hormones are essential to body function. Cortisol affects the body response to stress, the body's ability to convert food into energy and the immune system's inflammatory response. Aldosterone helps to maintain the balance of sodium, potassium and water within the body. Both hormones also help to regulate blood pressure. When these hormones are at insufficient levels within the body, distressing and dangerous symptoms may occur. ...


Read More...

Adrenal Tumors

The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys at the back of the upper abdominal cavity. These small, triangular organs produce several hormones, including aldosterone, cortisol, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, cortisone, adrenalin and norepinephrine. Tumors can cause the adrenal glands to produce too much of one or more of these substances, resulting in serious health issues. Tumors of the adrenal gland may be caused by diseases of the endocrine system, such as Conn's syndrome, or may result in the development of endocrine diseases, such as Cushing's syndrome. Most adrenal tumors, even those that cause symptoms, are benign. ...


Read More...

Bone Mineral Density Test

A bone mineral density (BMD) test evaluates an individual's bone strength by measuring the density of calcium and other minerals in particular areas of bone. During normal aging, bones lose minerals and become thinner. If they become abnormally thin, however, the patient has a condition known as osteoporosis. ...


Read More...

Cushing's Syndrome

Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder caused by long-term exposure to abnormally high levels of cortisol. Sometimes, corticosteroids used to treat inflammatory disease can lead to Cushing's syndrome. At other times, the disorder is caused by a tumor on one of the endocrine glands or on the lungs. Cushing's syndrome should not be confused with Cushing's disease, which is a form of Cushing's syndrome in which the pituitary gland secretes too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) which in turn promotes the release of too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome most frequently occurs in adults between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients who are obese, diabetic, or suffer from hypertension are at greater risk of developing the disorder. ...


Read More...

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables sugar or glucose to enter cells. Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. ...


Read More...

Endocrinology

Endocrinology is the branch of medicine that focuses on the endocrine system, the system comprised of glands that produce essential hormones. These hormones regulate a great many bodily processes, including metabolism, reproduction, sexual function, growth and development. The glands of the endocrine system are the thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, ovaries, testes, adrenal, pituitary, and hypothalamus. Endocrinologists diagnose and treat glandular diseases and hormone imbalances. ...


Read More...

Graves' Disease

Graves' disease is a disorder of the immune system resulting in the overproduction of hormones by the thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. Like most other immune system irregularities, its cause is unknown, though research to date has shown that heredity, age, gender and stress level are risk factors for the condition. Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism and is most common in women between 20 and 40 years of age. Graves' disease is usually treatable and may even resolve on its own over time. Left untreated, however, a severe case can become life-threatening. ...


Read More...

Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland, which plays an important role in managing many of the functions of the body. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result of Hashimoto's disease, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women are more likely than men to develop this condition. Left untreated, Hashimoto's disease may cause a variety of health complications. ...


Read More...

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, also known as an overactive thyroid gland, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland excretes an excessive amount of thyroid hormones. This overproduction creates more hormones than the body needs and causes many important bodily functions to speed up. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use, metabolism, heart and nervous system functions and other metabolic functions. An overproduction of thyroid hormones can lead to weight loss, irregular heartbeat and irritability. Hyperthyroidism is more common in people over the age of 60 and women are more likely than men to develop hyperthyroidism. ...


Read More...

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a common condition that occurs when an underactive thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones to properly manage many important functions of the body. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use and metabolic functions. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women over the age of age of 60 are at the highest risk for developing hypothyroidism. Left untreated, this condition may cause a variety of health complications including obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease ...


Read More...

Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy

Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland malfunctions and produces an abnormal quantity of hormones. When a malfunctioning thyroid gland produces too much or too little hormone during pregnancy, abnormal hormone secretion can be damaging not only to the mother, but to the developing fetus as well. This is because thyroid hormone is essential to the development of the fetal brain and nervous system and, until about 12 weeks into gestation, the fetus depends on its mother's supply of thyroid hormone. ...


Read More...

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a rare endocrinological disorder in which an excessive amount of growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland after normal growth has been completed. In almost all cases, acromegaly results from a noncancerous tumor on the pituitary gland. In rare instances, acromegaly is caused by a tumor elsewhere in the body. ...


Read More...

Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia means that a patient has an overabundance of calcium in the blood. While calcium is essential and plays a significant role in maintaining bone strength, muscular contraction and central nervous system function, too much calcium can be harmful. Hypercalcemia most frequently affects women over 50 years of age. Most often, hypercalcemia is due to overactivity of the parathyroid gland, known as hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps regulate calcium blood levels. If these glands secrete too much PTH, the result is hypercalcemia. Other possible causes of this condition include hyperthyroidism, certain types of cancer, inflammatory granulomas, adrenal gland disorders, very high dietary calcium intake, kidney failure, an overabundance of vitamin D and certain medications. ...


Read More...

Hypoparathyroidism

Hypoparathyroidism is a disease condition in which the parathyroid glands, located at the base of the neck on the thyroid glands, produce too little parathyroid hormone, known as PTH. This hormone aids in regulating the levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D in the bloodstream. In patients with hypoparathyroidism, phosphorus levels increase and calcium levels decrease. ...


Read More...

Hypopituitarism

Hypopituitarism is a rare disorder in which the pituitary gland does not produce an adequate supply of one or more pituitary hormone. Because the pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain, produces hormones that control the functions of many other organs and glands, inadequate hormone production can lead to serious loss of function in one or another system of the body. ...


Read More...

Female Infertility

Couples are considered to have infertility problems if they have been unable to conceive after a prolonged period, usually a year, of regular, unprotected sexual intercourse. Infertility may be attributed to the man, the woman, or both partners. When a female cause of infertility is determined, which occurs about one-third of the time, there are many measures that can be taken to help the couple conceive. Single women who are having trouble becoming pregnant may also seek medical evaluation. ...


Read More...

Metabolic Bone Diseases

Metabolic bone disease refers to a variety of disorders that affect bone strength or structure. Osteoporosis is the most widespread of these conditions, but there are a number of other metabolic bone diseases that can lead to fractures, deformity and abnormal functioning if not treated promptly. These disorders may be the result of genetic factors, diet and lifestyle, or other underlying disease conditions. ...


Read More...

Hyperparathyroidism

The parathyroid glands are four small glands in the neck that are part of the endocrine system. They produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which maintains calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood.

The most common disease associated with the parathyroid glands is overproduction of PTH, known as hyperparathyroidism. Twice as many women as men suffer from this condition and the risk of developing hyperparathyroidism increases with age, as it is more common in patients over the age of 60. Risk factors for hyperparathyroidism include having had radiation treatment to the head or neck. Rarely, cancer may be the cause of the condition. ...


Read More...

Hypocalcemia

Hypocalcemia is a disorder in which there is a calcium deficiency in the blood. Calcium is an essential mineral that assists in bone strengthening, muscle contraction and proper functioning of the central nervous system. While patients with hypocalcemia may be asymptomatic, the condition can be life-threatening if left untreated. It most commonly occurs in populations where there is insufficient intake of vitamin D or in patients who have undergone a total parathyroidectomy (removal of the parathyroid glands). It may also occur as a congenital condition in infants, particularly those born prematurely or to a diabetic mother, or in infants stressed by illness or infection. ...


Read More...

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and brittle, placing them at a high risk for fracture. In all individuals, bone wears down over time, but is replaced with new bone tissue. As people age, bone loss occurs at a faster rate than new bone is created, resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the result of increasing bone loss, and is more common in older people, especially women. ...


Read More...

Parathyroidectomy

The parathyroid glands are four small glands located behind the thyroid that regulate the calcium level in the blood. By controlling the amount of calcium in the body, the parathyroid glands control the strength and density of the bones, as well as other systemic functions. A parathyroidectomy is a procedure during which one or more of the parathyroid glands is removed. The most common reason for a parathyroidectomy is the presence of a small benign tumor, known as an adenoma. The adenoma causes an overproduction of parathyroid hormone (PTH), resulting in hyperparathyroidism, an imbalance that can cause uncomfortable and serious symptoms. ...


Read More...

Pituitary Adenoma

A pituitary adenoma is a tumor that develops on the pituitary gland, a gland located at the base of the brain. Since the pituitary gland not only secretes several hormones, but also regulates secretions from other glands, an adenoma may affect many systems of the body. Pituitary adenomas are benign, though in rare instances they may become malignant. Treatment is usually required to ensure proper pituitary gland function and to alleviate or prevent symptoms. ...


Read More...

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine system disorder that commonly affects women in their reproductive years. Women with PCOS often have multiple small cysts on their ovaries and experience irregular menstrual periods. PCOS is the leading cause of infertility in women and although the exact cause is unknown, it is believed to be the result of a hormonal imbalance. In women with PCOS, the ovaries produce more androgens than normal. High levels of these hormones affect the development and release of eggs during ovulation, and may also cause troubling symptoms such as excess hair growth and acne. ...


Read More...

Precocious Puberty

Puberty is the period when a young person begins the process of sexual maturation that will result in the ability to reproduce. Puberty involves accelerated growth and the development of secondary sexual characteristics. These bodily changes occur at various ages, usually between 9 and 14 years of age for girls and 12 and 16 years of age for boys, and are associated with psychological changes as well. Precocious puberty occurs when the process of sexual maturation begins at an abnormally young age. ...


Read More...

Hormone Imbalance

Hormones are natural chemicals within the cells of the body that travel through the bloodstream to organs and tissues. Hormones are essential for a variety of functions, including regulating a woman's metabolism, growth, immunity function and sexual reproduction. Hormone production tends to decrease naturally over time. As the production of certain hormones decreases, there may be an overproduction of other hormones within the body, which often results in hormonal imbalances that affect the health in different ways. ...


Read More...
 

 

Addison's Disease

Addison's disease is a rare endocrine disorder in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough steroid hormones for proper bodily function. In people with Addison's disease, the adrenal glands do not produce enough cortisol, and in some cases, the adrenal glands also fail to produce enough aldosterone. These hormones are essential to body function. Cortisol affects the body response to stress, the body's ability to convert food into energy and the immune system's inflammatory response. Aldosterone helps to maintain the balance of sodium, potassium and water within the body. Both hormones also help to regulate blood pressure. When these hormones are at insufficient levels within the body, distressing and dangerous symptoms may occur. ...


Read More...
 

Adrenal Tumors

The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys at the back of the upper abdominal cavity. These small, triangular organs produce several hormones, including aldosterone, cortisol, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, cortisone, adrenalin and norepinephrine. Tumors can cause the adrenal glands to produce too much of one or more of these substances, resulting in serious health issues. Tumors of the adrenal gland may be caused by diseases of the endocrine system, such as Conn's syndrome, or may result in the development of endocrine diseases, such as Cushing's syndrome. Most adrenal tumors, even those that cause symptoms, are benign. ...


Read More...
 

Bone Mineral Density Test

A bone mineral density (BMD) test evaluates an individual's bone strength by measuring the density of calcium and other minerals in particular areas of bone. During normal aging, bones lose minerals and become thinner. If they become abnormally thin, however, the patient has a condition known as osteoporosis. ...


Read More...
 

Cushing's Syndrome

Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder caused by long-term exposure to abnormally high levels of cortisol. Sometimes, corticosteroids used to treat inflammatory disease can lead to Cushing's syndrome. At other times, the disorder is caused by a tumor on one of the endocrine glands or on the lungs. Cushing's syndrome should not be confused with Cushing's disease, which is a form of Cushing's syndrome in which the pituitary gland secretes too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) which in turn promotes the release of too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome most frequently occurs in adults between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients who are obese, diabetic, or suffer from hypertension are at greater risk of developing the disorder. ...


Read More...
 

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables sugar or glucose to enter cells. Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. ...


Read More...
 

Endocrinology

Endocrinology is the branch of medicine that focuses on the endocrine system, the system comprised of glands that produce essential hormones. These hormones regulate a great many bodily processes, including metabolism, reproduction, sexual function, growth and development. The glands of the endocrine system are the thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, ovaries, testes, adrenal, pituitary, and hypothalamus. Endocrinologists diagnose and treat glandular diseases and hormone imbalances. ...


Read More...
 

Graves' Disease

Graves' disease is a disorder of the immune system resulting in the overproduction of hormones by the thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. Like most other immune system irregularities, its cause is unknown, though research to date has shown that heredity, age, gender and stress level are risk factors for the condition. Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism and is most common in women between 20 and 40 years of age. Graves' disease is usually treatable and may even resolve on its own over time. Left untreated, however, a severe case can become life-threatening. ...


Read More...
 

Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland, which plays an important role in managing many of the functions of the body. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result of Hashimoto's disease, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women are more likely than men to develop this condition. Left untreated, Hashimoto's disease may cause a variety of health complications. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, also known as an overactive thyroid gland, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland excretes an excessive amount of thyroid hormones. This overproduction creates more hormones than the body needs and causes many important bodily functions to speed up. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use, metabolism, heart and nervous system functions and other metabolic functions. An overproduction of thyroid hormones can lead to weight loss, irregular heartbeat and irritability. Hyperthyroidism is more common in people over the age of 60 and women are more likely than men to develop hyperthyroidism. ...


Read More...
 

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a common condition that occurs when an underactive thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones to properly manage many important functions of the body. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use and metabolic functions. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women over the age of age of 60 are at the highest risk for developing hypothyroidism. Left untreated, this condition may cause a variety of health complications including obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease ...


Read More...
 

Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy

Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland malfunctions and produces an abnormal quantity of hormones. When a malfunctioning thyroid gland produces too much or too little hormone during pregnancy, abnormal hormone secretion can be damaging not only to the mother, but to the developing fetus as well. This is because thyroid hormone is essential to the development of the fetal brain and nervous system and, until about 12 weeks into gestation, the fetus depends on its mother's supply of thyroid hormone. ...


Read More...
 

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a rare endocrinological disorder in which an excessive amount of growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland after normal growth has been completed. In almost all cases, acromegaly results from a noncancerous tumor on the pituitary gland. In rare instances, acromegaly is caused by a tumor elsewhere in the body. ...


Read More...
 

Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia means that a patient has an overabundance of calcium in the blood. While calcium is essential and plays a significant role in maintaining bone strength, muscular contraction and central nervous system function, too much calcium can be harmful. Hypercalcemia most frequently affects women over 50 years of age. Most often, hypercalcemia is due to overactivity of the parathyroid gland, known as hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps regulate calcium blood levels. If these glands secrete too much PTH, the result is hypercalcemia. Other possible causes of this condition include hyperthyroidism, certain types of cancer, inflammatory granulomas, adrenal gland disorders, very high dietary calcium intake, kidney failure, an overabundance of vitamin D and certain medications. ...


Read More...
 

Hypoparathyroidism

Hypoparathyroidism is a disease condition in which the parathyroid glands, located at the base of the neck on the thyroid glands, produce too little parathyroid hormone, known as PTH. This hormone aids in regulating the levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D in the bloodstream. In patients with hypoparathyroidism, phosphorus levels increase and calcium levels decrease. ...


Read More...
 

Hypopituitarism

Hypopituitarism is a rare disorder in which the pituitary gland does not produce an adequate supply of one or more pituitary hormone. Because the pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain, produces hormones that control the functions of many other organs and glands, inadequate hormone production can lead to serious loss of function in one or another system of the body. ...


Read More...
 

Female Infertility

Couples are considered to have infertility problems if they have been unable to conceive after a prolonged period, usually a year, of regular, unprotected sexual intercourse. Infertility may be attributed to the man, the woman, or both partners. When a female cause of infertility is determined, which occurs about one-third of the time, there are many measures that can be taken to help the couple conceive. Single women who are having trouble becoming pregnant may also seek medical evaluation. ...


Read More...
 

Metabolic Bone Diseases

Metabolic bone disease refers to a variety of disorders that affect bone strength or structure. Osteoporosis is the most widespread of these conditions, but there are a number of other metabolic bone diseases that can lead to fractures, deformity and abnormal functioning if not treated promptly. These disorders may be the result of genetic factors, diet and lifestyle, or other underlying disease conditions. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperparathyroidism

The parathyroid glands are four small glands in the neck that are part of the endocrine system. They produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which maintains calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood.

The most common disease associated with the parathyroid glands is overproduction of PTH, known as hyperparathyroidism. Twice as many women as men suffer from this condition and the risk of developing hyperparathyroidism increases with age, as it is more common in patients over the age of 60. Risk factors for hyperparathyroidism include having had radiation treatment to the head or neck. Rarely, cancer may be the cause of the condition. ...


Read More...
 

Hypocalcemia

Hypocalcemia is a disorder in which there is a calcium deficiency in the blood. Calcium is an essential mineral that assists in bone strengthening, muscle contraction and proper functioning of the central nervous system. While patients with hypocalcemia may be asymptomatic, the condition can be life-threatening if left untreated. It most commonly occurs in populations where there is insufficient intake of vitamin D or in patients who have undergone a total parathyroidectomy (removal of the parathyroid glands). It may also occur as a congenital condition in infants, particularly those born prematurely or to a diabetic mother, or in infants stressed by illness or infection. ...


Read More...
 

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and brittle, placing them at a high risk for fracture. In all individuals, bone wears down over time, but is replaced with new bone tissue. As people age, bone loss occurs at a faster rate than new bone is created, resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the result of increasing bone loss, and is more common in older people, especially women. ...


Read More...
 

Parathyroidectomy

The parathyroid glands are four small glands located behind the thyroid that regulate the calcium level in the blood. By controlling the amount of calcium in the body, the parathyroid glands control the strength and density of the bones, as well as other systemic functions. A parathyroidectomy is a procedure during which one or more of the parathyroid glands is removed. The most common reason for a parathyroidectomy is the presence of a small benign tumor, known as an adenoma. The adenoma causes an overproduction of parathyroid hormone (PTH), resulting in hyperparathyroidism, an imbalance that can cause uncomfortable and serious symptoms. ...


Read More...
 

Pituitary Adenoma

A pituitary adenoma is a tumor that develops on the pituitary gland, a gland located at the base of the brain. Since the pituitary gland not only secretes several hormones, but also regulates secretions from other glands, an adenoma may affect many systems of the body. Pituitary adenomas are benign, though in rare instances they may become malignant. Treatment is usually required to ensure proper pituitary gland function and to alleviate or prevent symptoms. ...


Read More...
 

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine system disorder that commonly affects women in their reproductive years. Women with PCOS often have multiple small cysts on their ovaries and experience irregular menstrual periods. PCOS is the leading cause of infertility in women and although the exact cause is unknown, it is believed to be the result of a hormonal imbalance. In women with PCOS, the ovaries produce more androgens than normal. High levels of these hormones affect the development and release of eggs during ovulation, and may also cause troubling symptoms such as excess hair growth and acne. ...


Read More...
 

Precocious Puberty

Puberty is the period when a young person begins the process of sexual maturation that will result in the ability to reproduce. Puberty involves accelerated growth and the development of secondary sexual characteristics. These bodily changes occur at various ages, usually between 9 and 14 years of age for girls and 12 and 16 years of age for boys, and are associated with psychological changes as well. Precocious puberty occurs when the process of sexual maturation begins at an abnormally young age. ...


Read More...
 

Hormone Imbalance

Hormones are natural chemicals within the cells of the body that travel through the bloodstream to organs and tissues. Hormones are essential for a variety of functions, including regulating a woman's metabolism, growth, immunity function and sexual reproduction. Hormone production tends to decrease naturally over time. As the production of certain hormones decreases, there may be an overproduction of other hormones within the body, which often results in hormonal imbalances that affect the health in different ways. ...


Read More...
 

Adrenal Tumors

The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys at the back of the upper abdominal cavity. These small, triangular organs produce several hormones, including aldosterone, cortisol, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, cortisone, adrenalin and norepinephrine. Tumors can cause the adrenal glands to produce too much of one or more of these substances, resulting in serious health issues. Tumors of the adrenal gland may be caused by diseases of the endocrine system, such as Conn's syndrome, or may result in the development of endocrine diseases, such as Cushing's syndrome. Most adrenal tumors, even those that cause symptoms, are benign. ...


Read More...
 

Bone Mineral Density Test

A bone mineral density (BMD) test evaluates an individual's bone strength by measuring the density of calcium and other minerals in particular areas of bone. During normal aging, bones lose minerals and become thinner. If they become abnormally thin, however, the patient has a condition known as osteoporosis. ...


Read More...
 

Cushing's Syndrome

Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder caused by long-term exposure to abnormally high levels of cortisol. Sometimes, corticosteroids used to treat inflammatory disease can lead to Cushing's syndrome. At other times, the disorder is caused by a tumor on one of the endocrine glands or on the lungs. Cushing's syndrome should not be confused with Cushing's disease, which is a form of Cushing's syndrome in which the pituitary gland secretes too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) which in turn promotes the release of too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome most frequently occurs in adults between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients who are obese, diabetic, or suffer from hypertension are at greater risk of developing the disorder. ...


Read More...
 

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables sugar or glucose to enter cells. Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. ...


Read More...
 

Endocrinology

Endocrinology is the branch of medicine that focuses on the endocrine system, the system comprised of glands that produce essential hormones. These hormones regulate a great many bodily processes, including metabolism, reproduction, sexual function, growth and development. The glands of the endocrine system are the thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, ovaries, testes, adrenal, pituitary, and hypothalamus. Endocrinologists diagnose and treat glandular diseases and hormone imbalances. ...


Read More...
 

Graves' Disease

Graves' disease is a disorder of the immune system resulting in the overproduction of hormones by the thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. Like most other immune system irregularities, its cause is unknown, though research to date has shown that heredity, age, gender and stress level are risk factors for the condition. Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism and is most common in women between 20 and 40 years of age. Graves' disease is usually treatable and may even resolve on its own over time. Left untreated, however, a severe case can become life-threatening. ...


Read More...
 

Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland, which plays an important role in managing many of the functions of the body. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result of Hashimoto's disease, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women are more likely than men to develop this condition. Left untreated, Hashimoto's disease may cause a variety of health complications. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, also known as an overactive thyroid gland, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland excretes an excessive amount of thyroid hormones. This overproduction creates more hormones than the body needs and causes many important bodily functions to speed up. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use, metabolism, heart and nervous system functions and other metabolic functions. An overproduction of thyroid hormones can lead to weight loss, irregular heartbeat and irritability. Hyperthyroidism is more common in people over the age of 60 and women are more likely than men to develop hyperthyroidism. ...


Read More...
 

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a common condition that occurs when an underactive thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones to properly manage many important functions of the body. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use and metabolic functions. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women over the age of age of 60 are at the highest risk for developing hypothyroidism. Left untreated, this condition may cause a variety of health complications including obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease ...


Read More...
 

Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy

Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland malfunctions and produces an abnormal quantity of hormones. When a malfunctioning thyroid gland produces too much or too little hormone during pregnancy, abnormal hormone secretion can be damaging not only to the mother, but to the developing fetus as well. This is because thyroid hormone is essential to the development of the fetal brain and nervous system and, until about 12 weeks into gestation, the fetus depends on its mother's supply of thyroid hormone. ...


Read More...
 

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a rare endocrinological disorder in which an excessive amount of growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland after normal growth has been completed. In almost all cases, acromegaly results from a noncancerous tumor on the pituitary gland. In rare instances, acromegaly is caused by a tumor elsewhere in the body. ...


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Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia means that a patient has an overabundance of calcium in the blood. While calcium is essential and plays a significant role in maintaining bone strength, muscular contraction and central nervous system function, too much calcium can be harmful. Hypercalcemia most frequently affects women over 50 years of age. Most often, hypercalcemia is due to overactivity of the parathyroid gland, known as hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps regulate calcium blood levels. If these glands secrete too much PTH, the result is hypercalcemia. Other possible causes of this condition include hyperthyroidism, certain types of cancer, inflammatory granulomas, adrenal gland disorders, very high dietary calcium intake, kidney failure, an overabundance of vitamin D and certain medications. ...


Read More...
 

Hypoparathyroidism

Hypoparathyroidism is a disease condition in which the parathyroid glands, located at the base of the neck on the thyroid glands, produce too little parathyroid hormone, known as PTH. This hormone aids in regulating the levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D in the bloodstream. In patients with hypoparathyroidism, phosphorus levels increase and calcium levels decrease. ...


Read More...
 

Hypopituitarism

Hypopituitarism is a rare disorder in which the pituitary gland does not produce an adequate supply of one or more pituitary hormone. Because the pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain, produces hormones that control the functions of many other organs and glands, inadequate hormone production can lead to serious loss of function in one or another system of the body. ...


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Metabolic Bone Diseases

Metabolic bone disease refers to a variety of disorders that affect bone strength or structure. Osteoporosis is the most widespread of these conditions, but there are a number of other metabolic bone diseases that can lead to fractures, deformity and abnormal functioning if not treated promptly. These disorders may be the result of genetic factors, diet and lifestyle, or other underlying disease conditions. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperparathyroidism

The parathyroid glands are four small glands in the neck that are part of the endocrine system. They produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which maintains calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood.

The most common disease associated with the parathyroid glands is overproduction of PTH, known as hyperparathyroidism. Twice as many women as men suffer from this condition and the risk of developing hyperparathyroidism increases with age, as it is more common in patients over the age of 60. Risk factors for hyperparathyroidism include having had radiation treatment to the head or neck. Rarely, cancer may be the cause of the condition. ...


Read More...
 

Hypocalcemia

Hypocalcemia is a disorder in which there is a calcium deficiency in the blood. Calcium is an essential mineral that assists in bone strengthening, muscle contraction and proper functioning of the central nervous system. While patients with hypocalcemia may be asymptomatic, the condition can be life-threatening if left untreated. It most commonly occurs in populations where there is insufficient intake of vitamin D or in patients who have undergone a total parathyroidectomy (removal of the parathyroid glands). It may also occur as a congenital condition in infants, particularly those born prematurely or to a diabetic mother, or in infants stressed by illness or infection. ...


Read More...
 

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and brittle, placing them at a high risk for fracture. In all individuals, bone wears down over time, but is replaced with new bone tissue. As people age, bone loss occurs at a faster rate than new bone is created, resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the result of increasing bone loss, and is more common in older people, especially women. ...


Read More...
 

Pituitary Adenoma

A pituitary adenoma is a tumor that develops on the pituitary gland, a gland located at the base of the brain. Since the pituitary gland not only secretes several hormones, but also regulates secretions from other glands, an adenoma may affect many systems of the body. Pituitary adenomas are benign, though in rare instances they may become malignant. Treatment is usually required to ensure proper pituitary gland function and to alleviate or prevent symptoms. ...


Read More...
 

Diet and Exercise

Developing a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen are equally important. Many people only consider improving their diet and exercise routine when they want to lose weight. Diet and exercise, however, should not be forgotten once weight loss goals are achieved since they are important health factors even in individuals who are at an optimal weight. ...


Read More...
 

Exercise

Regular exercise has many benefits that may help individuals live longer, healthier lives. Individuals who engage in regular moderately intense physical activity may reduce their risks of developing heart disease and other serious illnesses.

Benefits of an Exercise Routine

Regular physical activity can improve health and lengthen life expectancy by helping a patient to achieve and maintain an appropriate weight, become energetic and fit, strengthen the immune system, and preserve emotional balance. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperprolactinemia

Hyperprolactinemia is a condition involving an excess of the hormone prolactin in the blood. Prolactin is secreted by the pituitary gland and is normally found in very small quantities in men and women. It is responsible for breast development in girls and milk production in women after childbirth, so levels typically only rise during pregnancy. ...


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Hypophosphatemia

Hypophosphatemia is a metabolic condition in which the level of phosphorus in the blood is too low. Phosphorus, the second most abundant mineral in the body after calcium, is important to the healthy functioning of the body because, together with the B vitamins, it assists in the formation of healthy teeth and bones and the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats. It also manufactures protein for growth and repair of cells and assists in kidney function, muscle contractions, nerve signals, and heartbeat. Because phosphorus is necessary for good health, hypophosphatemia is serious cause for concern. Fortunately, the condition is usually highly treatable. ...


Read More...
 

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is a relatively recent development in diabetic care. In use for several decades, insulin pump therapy is a computerized method of insulin delivery.

While insulin pump therapy has been used in patients with type 1 diabetes for quite some time, during the past decade it has begun to be used in patients with type 2 diabetes. In both cases, the insulin pump has been found to be efficient and effective and is the preferred method of treatment for many patients. ...


Read More...
 

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is the classification for a collection of conditions that when combined together increase the risk of developing coronary artery disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is also known as:

  • Syndrome X
  • Dysmetabolic syndrome
  • Insulin resistance syndrome

Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

More than 40 percent of people in the United States over the age of 60 suffer from metabolic syndrome. This condition is present when there are three or more of the following indications: ...


Read More...
 

Body Mass Index

Body mass index, or BMI, is a calculation of total body fat based on height and weight. It is used to determine whether a patient is underweight, at a healthy weight or overweight. A high BMI can alert both doctor and patient to potential health risks associated with obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, breathing difficulties, severe sleep apnea or certain cancers. A low BMI can help to diagnose various illnesses which lead to or are precipitated by malnutrition, such as anemia, eating disorders or other types of cancer. ...


Read More...
 

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables sugar or glucose to enter cells. Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. ...


Read More...
 

Diabetic Foot Care

Because of their distance from the heart and because of the force of gravity, the feet and legs are more at risk for difficulties with circulation and healing than other parts of the body. In patients with diabetes, these risks are exacerbated by the disease since diabetes can lead to: impaired circulation, nerve damage (neuropathy), and a damaged immune system. Not only is the diabetic patient less able to fight off infection, but is also frequently unaware of injuries because of neuropathy and impaired vision. ...


Read More...
 

Diet and Exercise

Developing a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen are equally important. Many people only consider improving their diet and exercise routine when they want to lose weight. Diet and exercise, however, should not be forgotten once weight loss goals are achieved since they are important health factors even in individuals who are at an optimal weight. ...


Read More...
 

Exercise

Regular exercise has many benefits that may help individuals live longer, healthier lives. Individuals who engage in regular moderately intense physical activity may reduce their risks of developing heart disease and other serious illnesses.

Benefits of an Exercise Routine

Regular physical activity can improve health and lengthen life expectancy by helping a patient to achieve and maintain an appropriate weight, become energetic and fit, strengthen the immune system, and preserve emotional balance. ...


Read More...
 

Graves' Disease

Graves' disease is a disorder of the immune system resulting in the overproduction of hormones by the thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. Like most other immune system irregularities, its cause is unknown, though research to date has shown that heredity, age, gender and stress level are risk factors for the condition. Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism and is most common in women between 20 and 40 years of age. Graves' disease is usually treatable and may even resolve on its own over time. Left untreated, however, a severe case can become life-threatening. ...


Read More...
 

Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland, which plays an important role in managing many of the functions of the body. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result of Hashimoto's disease, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women are more likely than men to develop this condition. Left untreated, Hashimoto's disease may cause a variety of health complications. ...


Read More...
 

Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia means that a patient has an overabundance of calcium in the blood. While calcium is essential and plays a significant role in maintaining bone strength, muscular contraction and central nervous system function, too much calcium can be harmful. Hypercalcemia most frequently affects women over 50 years of age. Most often, hypercalcemia is due to overactivity of the parathyroid gland, known as hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps regulate calcium blood levels. If these glands secrete too much PTH, the result is hypercalcemia. Other possible causes of this condition include hyperthyroidism, certain types of cancer, inflammatory granulomas, adrenal gland disorders, very high dietary calcium intake, kidney failure, an overabundance of vitamin D and certain medications. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, also known as an overactive thyroid gland, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland excretes an excessive amount of thyroid hormones. This overproduction creates more hormones than the body needs and causes many important bodily functions to speed up. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use, metabolism, heart and nervous system functions and other metabolic functions. An overproduction of thyroid hormones can lead to weight loss, irregular heartbeat and irritability. Hyperthyroidism is more common in people over the age of 60 and women are more likely than men to develop hyperthyroidism. ...


Read More...
 

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a common condition that occurs when an underactive thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones to properly manage many important functions of the body. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use and metabolic functions. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women over the age of age of 60 are at the highest risk for developing hypothyroidism. Left untreated, this condition may cause a variety of health complications including obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease ...


Read More...
 

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is a relatively recent development in diabetic care. In use for several decades, insulin pump therapy is a computerized method of insulin delivery.

While insulin pump therapy has been used in patients with type 1 diabetes for quite some time, during the past decade it has begun to be used in patients with type 2 diabetes. In both cases, the insulin pump has been found to be efficient and effective and is the preferred method of treatment for many patients. ...


Read More...
 

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is the classification for a collection of conditions that when combined together increase the risk of developing coronary artery disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is also known as:

  • Syndrome X
  • Dysmetabolic syndrome
  • Insulin resistance syndrome

Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

More than 40 percent of people in the United States over the age of 60 suffer from metabolic syndrome. This condition is present when there are three or more of the following indications: ...


Read More...
 

Metabolic Weight Loss

Obesity is a serious problem for millions of Americans, and losing weight is often challenging. Metabolic weight loss is a multidisciplinary approach to promote long-term weight loss by revving up the metabolism. Medical professionals who promote metabolic weight loss put together a plan that addresses the individual patient's needs and lifestyle. ...


Read More...
 

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common disorder in which an individual who consumes little or no alcohol accumulates fat around the liver. For most people who have this condition, there are no symptoms or complications. Nonetheless, because the liver is a vital organ, once NAFLD progresses causes liver dysfunction it becomes serious and potentially life-threatening. In fact, cirrhosis resulting from NAFLD is now one of the leading reasons for liver transplants in the United States. ...


Read More...
 

Nutrition

Proper diet is essential to maintaining good health. Keeping the body well-nourished and at a healthy weight has been proven to improve mood, quality of life and longevity. It may also go a long way in preventing or controlling many serious illnesses. Obesity, which has now reached epidemic proportions in the United States, and an enemy of good health, can be kept at bay through proper nutrition along with a program of healthy exercise. ...


Read More...
 

Obesity

Obesity is a chronic condition defined by an excess of body fat. Body fat has several important functions in the body, such as storing energy and providing insulation. Excess body fat, however, may interfere with an individual's health and well-being, particularly if a patient becomes morbidly obese. Not only does obesity interfere with everyday activities, it also increases the risk of developing serious medical conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. Obesity is a serious health issue presently reaching epidemic proportions in society. It results in medical complications and early morbidity for a great many people. Other health conditions caused or exacerbated by obesity may include heart disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, high cholesterol and asthma. The good news is that obesity is a treatable ailment and that modern medicine provides more remedies for the condition than previously existed. ...


Read More...
 

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and brittle, placing them at a high risk for fracture. In all individuals, bone wears down over time, but is replaced with new bone tissue. As people age, bone loss occurs at a faster rate than new bone is created, resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the result of increasing bone loss, and is more common in older people, especially women. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperparathyroidism FAQs

What is hyperparathyroidism?

Hyperparathyroidism is the primary disease associated with the parathyroid glands. There are four parathyroid glands, located in the neck on the thyroid gland. Hyperparathyroidism results from excessive secretion of the parathyroid hormone, PTH, a hormone which regulates calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood. ...


Read More...

...
Read More...
 

Body Mass Index

Body mass index, or BMI, is a calculation of total body fat based on height and weight. It is used to determine whether a patient is underweight, at a healthy weight or overweight. A high BMI can alert both doctor and patient to potential health risks associated with obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, breathing difficulties, severe sleep apnea or certain cancers. A low BMI can help to diagnose various illnesses which lead to or are precipitated by malnutrition, such as anemia, eating disorders or other types of cancer. ...


Read More...
 

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables sugar or glucose to enter cells. Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. ...


Read More...
 

Diabetic Foot Care

Because of their distance from the heart and because of the force of gravity, the feet and legs are more at risk for difficulties with circulation and healing than other parts of the body. In patients with diabetes, these risks are exacerbated by the disease since diabetes can lead to: impaired circulation, nerve damage (neuropathy), and a damaged immune system. Not only is the diabetic patient less able to fight off infection, but is also frequently unaware of injuries because of neuropathy and impaired vision. ...


Read More...
 

Diet and Exercise

Developing a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen are equally important. Many people only consider improving their diet and exercise routine when they want to lose weight. Diet and exercise, however, should not be forgotten once weight loss goals are achieved since they are important health factors even in individuals who are at an optimal weight. ...


Read More...
 

Exercise

Regular exercise has many benefits that may help individuals live longer, healthier lives. Individuals who engage in regular moderately intense physical activity may reduce their risks of developing heart disease and other serious illnesses.

Benefits of an Exercise Routine

Regular physical activity can improve health and lengthen life expectancy by helping a patient to achieve and maintain an appropriate weight, become energetic and fit, strengthen the immune system, and preserve emotional balance. ...


Read More...
 

Graves' Disease

Graves' disease is a disorder of the immune system resulting in the overproduction of hormones by the thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. Like most other immune system irregularities, its cause is unknown, though research to date has shown that heredity, age, gender and stress level are risk factors for the condition. Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism and is most common in women between 20 and 40 years of age. Graves' disease is usually treatable and may even resolve on its own over time. Left untreated, however, a severe case can become life-threatening. ...


Read More...
 

Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland, which plays an important role in managing many of the functions of the body. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result of Hashimoto's disease, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women are more likely than men to develop this condition. Left untreated, Hashimoto's disease may cause a variety of health complications. ...


Read More...
 

Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia means that a patient has an overabundance of calcium in the blood. While calcium is essential and plays a significant role in maintaining bone strength, muscular contraction and central nervous system function, too much calcium can be harmful. Hypercalcemia most frequently affects women over 50 years of age. Most often, hypercalcemia is due to overactivity of the parathyroid gland, known as hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps regulate calcium blood levels. If these glands secrete too much PTH, the result is hypercalcemia. Other possible causes of this condition include hyperthyroidism, certain types of cancer, inflammatory granulomas, adrenal gland disorders, very high dietary calcium intake, kidney failure, an overabundance of vitamin D and certain medications. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, also known as an overactive thyroid gland, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland excretes an excessive amount of thyroid hormones. This overproduction creates more hormones than the body needs and causes many important bodily functions to speed up. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use, metabolism, heart and nervous system functions and other metabolic functions. An overproduction of thyroid hormones can lead to weight loss, irregular heartbeat and irritability. Hyperthyroidism is more common in people over the age of 60 and women are more likely than men to develop hyperthyroidism. ...


Read More...
 

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a common condition that occurs when an underactive thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones to properly manage many important functions of the body. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use and metabolic functions. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women over the age of age of 60 are at the highest risk for developing hypothyroidism. Left untreated, this condition may cause a variety of health complications including obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease ...


Read More...
 

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is a relatively recent development in diabetic care. In use for several decades, insulin pump therapy is a computerized method of insulin delivery.

While insulin pump therapy has been used in patients with type 1 diabetes for quite some time, during the past decade it has begun to be used in patients with type 2 diabetes. In both cases, the insulin pump has been found to be efficient and effective and is the preferred method of treatment for many patients. ...


Read More...
 

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is the classification for a collection of conditions that when combined together increase the risk of developing coronary artery disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is also known as:

  • Syndrome X
  • Dysmetabolic syndrome
  • Insulin resistance syndrome

Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

More than 40 percent of people in the United States over the age of 60 suffer from metabolic syndrome. This condition is present when there are three or more of the following indications: ...


Read More...
 

Metabolic Weight Loss

Obesity is a serious problem for millions of Americans, and losing weight is often challenging. Metabolic weight loss is a multidisciplinary approach to promote long-term weight loss by revving up the metabolism. Medical professionals who promote metabolic weight loss put together a plan that addresses the individual patient's needs and lifestyle. ...


Read More...
 

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common disorder in which an individual who consumes little or no alcohol accumulates fat around the liver. For most people who have this condition, there are no symptoms or complications. Nonetheless, because the liver is a vital organ, once NAFLD progresses causes liver dysfunction it becomes serious and potentially life-threatening. In fact, cirrhosis resulting from NAFLD is now one of the leading reasons for liver transplants in the United States. ...


Read More...
 

Nutrition

Proper diet is essential to maintaining good health. Keeping the body well-nourished and at a healthy weight has been proven to improve mood, quality of life and longevity. It may also go a long way in preventing or controlling many serious illnesses. Obesity, which has now reached epidemic proportions in the United States, and an enemy of good health, can be kept at bay through proper nutrition along with a program of healthy exercise. ...


Read More...
 

Obesity

Obesity is a chronic condition defined by an excess of body fat. Body fat has several important functions in the body, such as storing energy and providing insulation. Excess body fat, however, may interfere with an individual's health and well-being, particularly if a patient becomes morbidly obese. Not only does obesity interfere with everyday activities, it also increases the risk of developing serious medical conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. Obesity is a serious health issue presently reaching epidemic proportions in society. It results in medical complications and early morbidity for a great many people. Other health conditions caused or exacerbated by obesity may include heart disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, high cholesterol and asthma. The good news is that obesity is a treatable ailment and that modern medicine provides more remedies for the condition than previously existed. ...


Read More...
 

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and brittle, placing them at a high risk for fracture. In all individuals, bone wears down over time, but is replaced with new bone tissue. As people age, bone loss occurs at a faster rate than new bone is created, resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the result of increasing bone loss, and is more common in older people, especially women. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperparathyroidism FAQs

What is hyperparathyroidism?

Hyperparathyroidism is the primary disease associated with the parathyroid glands. There are four parathyroid glands, located in the neck on the thyroid gland. Hyperparathyroidism results from excessive secretion of the parathyroid hormone, PTH, a hormone which regulates calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood. ...


Read More...

...
Read More...
 

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables sugar or glucose to enter cells. Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. ...


Read More...

Diet and Exercise

Developing a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen are equally important. Many people only consider improving their diet and exercise routine when they want to lose weight. Diet and exercise, however, should not be forgotten once weight loss goals are achieved since they are important health factors even in individuals who are at an optimal weight. ...


Read More...

Graves' Disease

Graves' disease is a disorder of the immune system resulting in the overproduction of hormones by the thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. Like most other immune system irregularities, its cause is unknown, though research to date has shown that heredity, age, gender and stress level are risk factors for the condition. Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism and is most common in women between 20 and 40 years of age. Graves' disease is usually treatable and may even resolve on its own over time. Left untreated, however, a severe case can become life-threatening. ...


Read More...

Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland, which plays an important role in managing many of the functions of the body. Also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result of Hashimoto's disease, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women are more likely than men to develop this condition. Left untreated, Hashimoto's disease may cause a variety of health complications. ...


Read More...

Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia means that a patient has an overabundance of calcium in the blood. While calcium is essential and plays a significant role in maintaining bone strength, muscular contraction and central nervous system function, too much calcium can be harmful. Hypercalcemia most frequently affects women over 50 years of age. Most often, hypercalcemia is due to overactivity of the parathyroid gland, known as hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps regulate calcium blood levels. If these glands secrete too much PTH, the result is hypercalcemia. Other possible causes of this condition include hyperthyroidism, certain types of cancer, inflammatory granulomas, adrenal gland disorders, very high dietary calcium intake, kidney failure, an overabundance of vitamin D and certain medications. ...


Read More...

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, also known as an overactive thyroid gland, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland excretes an excessive amount of thyroid hormones. This overproduction creates more hormones than the body needs and causes many important bodily functions to speed up. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use, metabolism, heart and nervous system functions and other metabolic functions. An overproduction of thyroid hormones can lead to weight loss, irregular heartbeat and irritability. Hyperthyroidism is more common in people over the age of 60 and women are more likely than men to develop hyperthyroidism. ...


Read More...

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a common condition that occurs when an underactive thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones to properly manage many important functions of the body. The thyroid is the gland in the front of the neck that controls energy use and metabolic functions. If the thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet the body's needs and causes certain functions of the body to slow down. As a result, functions such as heart rate, brain function and the rate that the body converts food into energy, all slow down. Women over the age of age of 60 are at the highest risk for developing hypothyroidism. Left untreated, this condition may cause a variety of health complications including obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease ...


Read More...

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is a relatively recent development in diabetic care. In use for several decades, insulin pump therapy is a computerized method of insulin delivery.

While insulin pump therapy has been used in patients with type 1 diabetes for quite some time, during the past decade it has begun to be used in patients with type 2 diabetes. In both cases, the insulin pump has been found to be efficient and effective and is the preferred method of treatment for many patients. ...


Read More...

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is the classification for a collection of conditions that when combined together increase the risk of developing coronary artery disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is also known as:

  • Syndrome X
  • Dysmetabolic syndrome
  • Insulin resistance syndrome

Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

More than 40 percent of people in the United States over the age of 60 suffer from metabolic syndrome. This condition is present when there are three or more of the following indications: ...


Read More...

Metabolic Weight Loss

Obesity is a serious problem for millions of Americans, and losing weight is often challenging. Metabolic weight loss is a multidisciplinary approach to promote long-term weight loss by revving up the metabolism. Medical professionals who promote metabolic weight loss put together a plan that addresses the individual patient's needs and lifestyle. ...


Read More...

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common disorder in which an individual who consumes little or no alcohol accumulates fat around the liver. For most people who have this condition, there are no symptoms or complications. Nonetheless, because the liver is a vital organ, once NAFLD progresses causes liver dysfunction it becomes serious and potentially life-threatening. In fact, cirrhosis resulting from NAFLD is now one of the leading reasons for liver transplants in the United States. ...


Read More...

Nutrition

Proper diet is essential to maintaining good health. Keeping the body well-nourished and at a healthy weight has been proven to improve mood, quality of life and longevity. It may also go a long way in preventing or controlling many serious illnesses. Obesity, which has now reached epidemic proportions in the United States, and an enemy of good health, can be kept at bay through proper nutrition along with a program of healthy exercise. ...


Read More...

Obesity

Obesity is a chronic condition defined by an excess of body fat. Body fat has several important functions in the body, such as storing energy and providing insulation. Excess body fat, however, may interfere with an individual's health and well-being, particularly if a patient becomes morbidly obese. Not only does obesity interfere with everyday activities, it also increases the risk of developing serious medical conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. Obesity is a serious health issue presently reaching epidemic proportions in society. It results in medical complications and early morbidity for a great many people. Other health conditions caused or exacerbated by obesity may include heart disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, high cholesterol and asthma. The good news is that obesity is a treatable ailment and that modern medicine provides more remedies for the condition than previously existed. ...


Read More...

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and brittle, placing them at a high risk for fracture. In all individuals, bone wears down over time, but is replaced with new bone tissue. As people age, bone loss occurs at a faster rate than new bone is created, resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the result of increasing bone loss, and is more common in older people, especially women. ...


Read More...

Hyperparathyroidism FAQs

What is hyperparathyroidism?

Hyperparathyroidism is the primary disease associated with the parathyroid glands. There are four parathyroid glands, located in the neck on the thyroid gland. Hyperparathyroidism results from excessive secretion of the parathyroid hormone, PTH, a hormone which regulates calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood. ...


Read More...